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Alternate Battery Sizes That Fit, Pros And Cons

group 35 24f 124f h5 battery cca

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#1 jburdman7

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Posted 19 January 2016 - 07:47 PM

The space allotted for a battery in a trix leaves the least room for experimentation of any car I've ever owned. It is simply a small space for a battery.  There are only very few batteries which will fit a trix at all, let alone be larger. I just assumed nothing better would fit! I'm glad vtirx looked in to this.

 

Not every battery will use every inch allotted in the BCI size standard but the larger capacity batteries in the line will be close. I've noticed for eg., that the Exide 36R(-60), which is in a group size which can be nearly a 9" tall battery, is actually only 7.5" tall. There are a few 24F batteries in some manufacturer's line-ups which will fit in a Trix as well. A 24F can be up to 11" L so most higher end batteries in the line will severely pinch the upper radiator hose.

 

The bottom line is that other sizes will fit with a little coaxing / shimming. Many other possible sizes have no real advantage, but who knows what sale you might run in to. If your trix needs a battery at the same time a buddy of yours is about to trash a car with one of these odd sizes in it, you can use this guise to exercise your environmental 3Rs- Reduce, reuse, recycle!

 

Listing dimensions for all possibilities gets pretty tedious. Different manufacturers might make different sizes in their lower capacity batteries. Here is the Interstate battery guide with the dimensions to their battery line.

 

I will assume that you do not want to convert to side terminals or extend the wires to allow for reversing the post polarity-

(not necessarily an exhaustive list but I tried)

Alternative fitments which will only work in very specific instances-

24F, IF the L is 10 3/8" or less

36R, IF short like the Excide I mentioned. It is max limit in length, so fitment will be tight with no real advantage in capacity.

I am sure there are others but these are the only ones I ran in to.

 

Battery

Group  CCA / RC  / CA / Lbs.

124F     700    120   875   40  Max capacity, max L&W dimensions.

H5-47   650     100   810   33  Good weight to capacity ratio. Size wise it looks to be a painless substitution.

35         640    100   800    38  Stock

24F       600    100   750    39 (using the specifications of the one Interstate 24F which would fit.) Max L dimension

H5-90   600     100   750    32 OK weight to capacity ratio

26R      540       81   675    28  lightest

 

Stand-out options

Anyone looking to shave pounds (looking for racing performance) should consider installing a H5-47 or another lighter option.

Anyone looking to shoehorn in the largest capacity and weight possible should consider installing a 124F.

 

If anyone tries something that does or does not work, let us know.

I know the short group 36 will fit but it is real tight between the upper radiator hose and the fuse box just as the 124F will be.

The 124F will fit with a modification to the battery tray and the fuse cover.


Edited by jburdman7, 19 January 2016 - 07:51 PM.


#2 dmsyr

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 11:14 AM

Nice info. There was a dude on corolla9 that used a boat battery to shed weight because he was a major autox addict. Can't remember what model it was tho. I found it on amazon a long time ago.
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#3 dmsyr

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Posted 20 January 2016 - 11:14 AM

Nice info. There was a dude on corolla9 that used a boat battery to shed weight because he was a major autox addict. Can't remember what model it was tho. I found it on amazon a long time ago.
Injen,Redliner9k PPE header,2.5 custom exhaust,D2 coilovers,6000k lows,3000k fogs,TRD Quickshifter,ES Motor Mount Inserts,custom painted carbon fiber hood,Altis grille,2nd gen Altis tails,ESAM visors,Altis roof spoiler,Altis duckbill spoiler,Ultra Racing 4 pt. strut bar,bronze 5zigen fn01r-c 17x8,Visual Garage sharkfin antenna,'03 Matrix XRS ecu

BOLTED AND SLAMMED

#4 m6soto

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Posted 25 September 2016 - 12:08 PM

Thanks, jburdman7, for the great info. Based on what you listed, 26R would be the best option there listed for me.

 

You have any thoughts on Braille Batteries? I've read good things about them... I've only done stock batteries (aka, heavy), and would like to get a lightweight one for my next one (about 4 yrs on my Toyota Truestart, currently).

 

Looking at their PDF catalog, looks like maybe the B2317RP might be the ticket? I live in Southern California, so we don't really deal w/ cold weather. This would be for my daily driver 07 Matrix.

 

They have them at Summit Racing for $200.

 

Battery Usage: Starting

Volts: 12 V

Battery Terminals: Top and side

Battery Type: AGM

Cranking Amps at 0 Degrees F: 475 amps

Cranking Amps at 32 Degrees F: 641 amps

Reserve Capacity: 45 minutes

Length (in): 6.880 in.

Width (in): 4.000 in.

Height (in): 6.120 in.

Weight: 17.000 lbs.

 

Interested to hear your opinions.


Edited by m6soto, 25 September 2016 - 12:10 PM.


#5 jburdman7

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Posted 20 March 2017 - 03:26 PM

That is light! Light weight will mean thin plates. Thin plates mean a short life. Less to sulfate and still work. I wouldn't do it but that is up to you. If you do, learn to equalize the cells and desulfate the battery. I do that and I typically get my batteries to last 8-11 years.

 

If you want to go balls-to-the-wall on a light battery I'd look in to the lithium-ion auto batteries but then KEEP IT COOL. You'd want to move the battery to the hatch but the wire would add weight. No venting issues so that is not a problem. Heat kills Li-on. So does charging them cold but that won't be an issue for you.

 

I should add the option of the 34 size battery. I just realized that Exide must use the guts to their 24F in the more suitably sized 34 case making for an excellent value combo. The old stats were taken from the Interstate (Johnson Consrols) guide I linked to in the OP.
Using the Exide extreme stats for the size 34:

Battery

Group  CCARC  / CA /   Lbs.
34         800    120   960    43.6

124F     700    120   875    40  Max capacity, max L&W dimensions.

H5-47   650     100   810    33  Good weight to capacity ratio. Size wise it looks to be a painless substitution.

35         640    100   800    38  Stock

24F       600    100   750    39 (using the specifications of the one Interstate 24F which would fit.) Max L dimension

H5-90   600     100   750    32 OK weight to capacity ratio

26R      540       81   675    28  lightest

 

I note how much  brand change can make a difference. The highest capacity Johnson Control battery in the 34 line is:
34        700     110  1,000   38

 

The bottom line is that for most applications the Exide Extreme 34 from the Home Depot for $94 is the best deal. It might be a tight fit tho. I'd say that I'd let you know when I try it but this site is down so much anymore that I have no idea when I will be back. Look at how long it took for me to see your post in the first place.



#6 m6soto

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 09:43 PM

That is light! Light weight will mean thin plates. Thin plates mean a short life. Less to sulfate and still work. I wouldn't do it but that is up to you. If you do, learn to equalize the cells and desulfate the battery. I do that and I typically get my batteries to last 8-11 years.

 

Thanks jburdman7.. OK. So there is a big negative, aside from price.. I think I'll stick w/ stock for now then. If I could spend extra $ up front and then have it last at least somewhat close to the same time, I might be game, but if also means greatly reduced life, nahhhhhh...

 

(PS. Ditto on the site being down... I've been checking in every once in a while to view your post and reply, but haven't been able to... And look at it now... 1 mo 10 days later... :biggrinsmiley: )


Edited by m6soto, 30 April 2017 - 09:43 PM.






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